Nice Taylor

I found this video over at The Fire Wire of Jason Mraz playing at the Taylor booth at the 2010 NAMM (the National Association of Music Merchants) show. I liked it so much (as you know I’m a big Taylor fan – see this post) I thought I’d share it here.

Paul Krugman – Dishonest Jerk

Paul Krugman is one of the most maddening columnists alive today. He’s an unabashed liberal, which is fine. Except that he constantly denigrates Republicans and conservatives for being deceitful, dishonest and hypocritical. The problem with his criticism is that it is a major case of the pot calling the kettle black.

The following is from a post on The Corner at NRO quoting from a James Taranto piece in the Wall Street Journal which illustrates his most recent utterance of hypocritical blather.

James Taranto has a great take-down of Dr. Krugman today. Apparently the conscience of a liberal is schizophrenic:

Former Enron adviser Paul Krugman takes note in his New York Times column of what he calls “the incredible gap that has opened up between the parties”:

Today, Democrats and Republicans live in different universes, both intellectually and morally.”What Democrats believe,” he says “is what textbook economics says”:

But that’s not how Republicans see it. Here’s what Senator Jon Kyl of Arizona, the second-ranking Republican in the Senate, had to say when defending Mr. Bunning’s position (although not joining his blockade): unemployment relief “doesn’t create new jobs. In fact, if anything, continuing to pay people unemployment compensation is a disincentive for them to seek new work.” Krugman scoffs: “To me, that’s a bizarre point of view—but then, I don’t live in Mr. Kyl’s universe.”

What does textbook economics have to say about this question? Here is a passage from a textbook called “Macroeconomics“:

Public policy designed to help workers who lose their jobs can lead to structural unemployment as an unintended side effect. . . . In other countries, particularly in Europe, benefits are more generous and last longer. The drawback to this generosity is that it reduces a worker’s incentive to quickly find a new job. Generous unemployment benefits in some European countries are widely believed to be one of the main causes of “Eurosclerosis,” the persistent high unemployment that affects a number of European countries.

So it turns out that what Krugman calls Sen. Kyl’s “bizarre point of view” is, in fact, textbook economics. The authors of that textbook are Paul Krugman and Robin Wells. Miss Wells is also known as Mrs. Paul Krugman.

As John Hinderaker points out in this post at Power Line, “…only the existence of Frank Rich prevents Krugman from being the world’s worst columnist”. My only modification would be that Thomas Friedman would also prevent Krugman from holding the title.

Why Texas Is Better

The Wall Street Journal has a good article/interview with Rick Perry. In it he talks about how Texas has been able to sustain higher economic growth rates and employment amidst the sagging national economy and how fiscal conservatism is the GOP’s ticket back to the game.

Magnificent Monday Quotes – One Great Quote

I can’t remember when I first stumbled across this one…but it’s a doozy.

“He is a man with a gun. He is a killer, a slayer. Patient and gentle as he is, he is a slayer. Self-effacing, self-forgetting, still he is a killer. . . All the other stuff, the love, the democracy, the floundering into lust, is a sort of by-play. The essential American soul is hard, isolate, stoic, and a killer. It has never yet melted.” — D. H. Lawrence, Studies in Classic American Literature (1923)

Magnificent Monday Quotes – George F. Will Edition

“A politician’s words reveal less about what he thinks about his subject than what he thinks about his audience.”

“A society that thinks the choice between ways of living is just a choice between equally eligible ‘lifestyles’ turns universities into academic cafeterias offering junk food for the mind.”

“Americans are overreaching; overreaching is the most admirable and most American of the many American excesses.”

“As advertising blather becomes the nation’s normal idiom, language becomes printed noise.”

“Baseball, it is said, is only a game. True. And the Grand Canyon is only a hole in Arizona. Not all holes, or games, are created equal.”

“Being elected to Congress is regarded as being sent on a looting raid for one’s friends.”

“Childhood is frequently a solemn business for those inside it.”

“Conservatives define themselves in terms of what they oppose.”

“Football incorporates the two worst elements of American society: violence punctuated by committee meetings.”

“If you seek [Alexander] Hamilton’s monument, look around. You are living in it. We honor Jefferson, but live in Hamilton’s country, a mighty industrial nation with a strong central government.”

“If your job is to leaven ordinary lives with elevating spectacle, be elevating or be gone.”

“In the lexicon of the political class, the word “sacrifice” means that the citizens are supposed to mail even more of their income to Washington so that the political class will not have to sacrifice the pleasure of spending it.”

“Leadership is, among other things, the ability to inflict pain and get away with it – short-term pain for long-term gain.”

“Pessimism is as American as apple pie – frozen apple pie with a slice of processed cheese.”

“Politicians fascinate because they constitute such a paradox; they are an elite that accomplishes mediocrity for the public good.”

“Politics should share one purpose with religion: the steady emancipation of the individual through the education of his passions.”

“Some parents say it is toy guns that make boys warlike. But give a boy a rubber duck and he will seize its neck like the butt of a pistol and shout ‘Bang!'”

“The future has a way of arriving unannounced.”

“The nice part about being a pessimist is that you are constantly being either proven right or pleasantly surprised.”

“The pursuit of perfection often impedes improvement.”

“There may be more poetry than justice in poetic justice.”

“Today more Americans are imprisoned for drug offenses than for property crimes.”

“Voters don’t decide issues, they decide who will decide issues.”

“World War II was the last government program that really worked.”

Magnificent Monday Quotes – G. K. Chesterton Edition

Chesterton is one of those authors that Conservatives are supposed to have read. I have not. I want to, I just haven’t gotten around to it. Anyway, here are some thought provoking quotes from G. K.

“‘My country, right or wrong,’ is a thing that no patriot would think of saying except in a desperate case. It is like saying, ‘My mother, drunk or sober.'”

“The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people.”

“Poets have been mysteriously silent on the subject of cheese.”

“Journalism largely consists of saying ‘Lord Jones is Dead’ to people who never knew that Lord Jones was alive.”

“There are no wise few. Every aristocracy that has ever existed has behaved, in all essential points, exactly like a small mob.”

“Art, like morality, consists of drawing the line somewhere.”

“A teacher who is not dogmatic is simply a teacher who is not teaching.”

“A new philosophy generally means in practice the praise of some old vice.”

“Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried.”

“Democracy means government by the uneducated, while aristocracy means government by the badly educated.”

“Love means to love that which is unlovable; or it is no virtue at all.”

“I believe what really happens in history is this: the old man is always wrong; and the young people are always wrong about what is wrong with him. The practical form it takes is this: that, while the old man may stand by some stupid custom, the young man always attacks it with some theory that turns out to be equally stupid.”

“The free man owns himself. He can damage himself with either eating or drinking; he can ruin himself with gambling. If he does he is certainly a damn fool, and he might possibly be a damned soul; but if he may not, he is not a free man any more than a dog.”

“Reason is always a kind of brute force; those who appeal to the head rather than the heart, however pallid and polite, are necessarily men of violence. We speak of ‘touching’ a man’s heart, but we can do nothing to his head but hit it.”

This one is for “C” – “Comforts that were rare among our forefathers are now multiplied in factories and handed out wholesale; and indeed, nobody nowadays, so long as he is content to go without air, space, quiet, decency and good manners, need be without anything whatever that he wants; or at least a reasonably cheap imitation of it.”

“The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.”

“The truth is, of course, that the curtness of the Ten Commandments is an evidence, not of the gloom and narrowness of a religion, but, on the contrary, of its liberality and humanity. It is shorter to state the things forbidden than the things permitted: precisely because most things are permitted, and only a few things are forbidden.”

“Women are the only realists; their whole object in life is to pit their realism against the extravagant, excessive, and occasionally drunken idealism of men.”

Magnificent Monday Quotes

I’ve been thinking about doing a post a week that is basically just quotes that I’ve run across over the past week. And since I already had a few saved up and today is Monday, I guess the weekly quote post will be on Mondays. So enjoy “Magnificent Monday Quotes”.

“Is not the fanaticism of your irreligion more absurd and more dangerous than the fanaticism of superstition? Begin by tolerating the faith of your fathers. You talk of nothing but tolerance, and never was a sect more intolerant.” – Elie Catherine Freron

I didn’t know who Freron was when I came across this but, thanks to the magic of the internet, I quickly found out that he was a French philosopher and critic of the French Enlightenment movement of of Voltaire especially.

“I destroy my enemies when I make them my friends.” – Abraham Lincoln

“You say that it is your custom to burn widows. Very well. We also have a custom: when men burn a woman alive, we tie a rope around their necks and we hang them. Build your funeral pyre; beside it, my carpenters will build a gallows. You follow your custom. And then we will follow ours.” – General Charles Napier

That’s one of my favorite quotes. Napier is referring to the Indian practice of “suttee” – the tradition of burning widows on the funeral pyres of their husbands.

“All great things are simple, and many can be expressed in single words: freedom, justice, honor, duty, mercy, hope.” – Sir Winston Churchill

“It is the nature of all greatness not to be exact.” – Edmund Burke

I included the above for a co-worker of mine who has the maddening policy of never giving anyone a direct answer to any question. You know who I’m talking about LO III.

“If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there’d be a shortage of sand.” – Milton Friedman

Since baseball season is right around the corner, I’ll call it a post with two quotes about the Great Game.

“I see great things in baseball. It’s our game – the American game. It will take our people out-of-doors, fill them with oxygen, give them a larger physical stoicism. Tend to relieve us from being a nervous, dyspeptic set. Repair these losses, and be a blessing to us.” – Walt Whitman

“If a woman has to choose between catching a fly ball and saving an infant’s life, she will choose to save the infant’s life without even considering if there are men on base.” – Dave Barry